Posted in aches, Arthritis, Chronic lower back pain, chronic pain, Coping with Chronic Pain, Inflammation, Knee pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Surgeries

Relief Options for Chronic Pain

PART 3  –  OPIOIDS

Except for Marijuana, controversy surrounds Opioids more than any of the previous medications discussed in Parts 1 and 2. Suicides, accidental overdoses, and misuse of Opioids by prominent celebrities fill the headlines and invoke a strong media reaction. This escalated attention cautions healthcare physicians to seek other options for their patients.

The American Academy of Pain Medicine, National Institutes and Health, American Chiropractic Association, and American Society of Addiction Medicine provide chronic pain and prescription opioids statistics. These statistics cover the United States only:

Chronic pain statistics indicate more people suffer from pain than the combination of diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Excluding acute pain conditions and children suffering from pain, 50 million to 100 million adults suffer from chronic pain. Of those adults, 27% seek treatment for lower back pain, 15% for severe headaches to migraine pain, and another 15% for neck pain. Alarmingly, these numbers continue to grow daily.

Research of the prescription pain pill epidemic for 2015 shows 20,404 people died from Opioids overdoses. Prescription opioids account for substance abuse disorders by two million people. Increased national crime, pharmacy burglaries, and overdose deaths were tied to Opioids abuse.

Since the rise of prescription drug overdoses, especially prescription Opioids, views have changed among healthcare providers for prescribing Opioids for the treatment of chronic pain. However, Opioids are prescribed in cases of short-term to help patients recover from fractures or post surgery.

Your primary care physician will no longer prescribe Opioids for moderate to severe chronic pain. Instead, you’ll be referred to a Pain Management Facility where specialists evaluate and monitor prescriptions of Opioids.

Many chronic pain patients find themselves suffering more and receiving little or no assistance of treatment for their pain due to the abuse and misuse epidemic. As the fear of overdosing heightens many physicians, including specialists, seek other options to treat chronic pain. Physical therapy, minimally invasive procedures, and lifestyle changes are the preferred options. However, these options, exhausted by most chronically ill patients, bring little to no relief.

So, how do chronic pain patients find relief? If Opioids are the only option available for severe chronic pain then understanding the risks involved with these drugs is mandatory. The specialists associated with Paindoctor.com (and most pain management specialists) treat chronically ill patients using a 12-step Opioid Checklist to ensure patient safety. (You can find the risks of Opioids listed after the checklist.)

Taking Opioids is a risk. But most chronic pain sufferers take that risk to acquire a fraction of the quality of life they enjoyed prior to the onset of chronic pain.

What are Opioid medications?

As the oldest known class of drugs in the world, Opioids refer to either morphine or other opium poppy-based medications – narcotics. Opioids suppress the pain perception by reducing pain signals as they are transmitted through the nervous system.

Below are some types of Opioids (and their generics) used for chronic pain treatment. ALL of these medications require a prescription.

Hydrocodone (Hysingla ER, Zohydro ER)

-*Hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Lorcet, Lortab, Norco, Vicodin)

Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo)

Oxycodone (Oxycontin, Oxecta, Roxicodone)

-*Oxycodone and Acetaminophen (Percocdet, Endocet, Roxicet)

Oxycodone and Naloxone (Targiniq ER)

Morphine (Astramorph, Avinza, Kadian, MS Contin, Ora-Morph SR)

Meperidine (Demerol)

Methadone (Dolophine, Methadose)

Fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic, Fentora)

Codeine (only available in generic form)

(*Includes Acetaminophen in the compound. Avoid other products containing acetaminophen (ex: Tylenol) due to increased risk of liver problems.)

For pain relief all day and through the night your doctor may prescribe specific doses of your pain medication. However, there is a chance you may experience “breakthrough” pain. Breakthrough pain is a flare of pain experienced even though you receive round-the-clock pain medication.1 In this case, you may be given a prescription with “as needed” instructions.

Regular visits to the pain specialist are a requirement of care if you are prescribed Opioids. These visits include questions asked by your specialist:

          1. Are you responding to the Opioid?
          2. Are you experiencing any side effects?
          3. Have you developed a medical condition or potential interaction that may increase the risk of side effects?
          4. Are you taking the medication as directed?2

NOTE:  Never change the dosing of any Opioid medication without first checking with your physician. If your pain isn’t managed by the medication prescribed, your physician may change the dose or try another Opioid drug.

Opioids can be dangerous if taken with 1) antidepressants, 2)antihistamines, and/or 3)sleeping pills. Be sure your doctor knows all medicines you are taking. Other prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, and herbal supplements may cause additional problems when taken with Opioids.

When you’re ready to quit the Opioids, your pain specialist will advise a slow weaning off from the Opioids to help your body adjust to the removal of the pain medications. Withdrawal symptoms occur if you stop the Opioids abruptly.

As reviewed in Parts 1 & 2 of this series, most medications have side effects and Opioids are no different. Common side effects include:

*Constipation                       *Sedation

*Fatigue                                 *Nausea

*Vomiting                              *Confusion

*Dry Mouth                           *Constricted pupils (miosis)

*Itching (pruritis)

However, there are more serious side effects including:

**Urinary retention              **Hearing loss

**Respiratory depression    **Hallucination

**Hypothermia                       **Delirium

**Hyperalgesia (increased sensitivity to pain)

**Abnormal heartbeats (arrhythmias)

LARGE doses can induce:

***Serious respiratory problems              ***Depression

***Oxygen deprivation                                ***Unconsciousness

***Overdose                                                   ***Death

Taking Opioids for the long-term may cause tolerance, dependency, and/or addiction.

Tolerance occurs when the need for Opioids causes increasing the dosages.

Dependence is a physical or psychological effect. A physical dependency occurs when you (abruptly) stop taking your Opioid medications resulting in a withdrawal syndrome. Psychological dependency occurs as an emotional need for the drug when there is no physical need.

A small percentage of patients who use Opioids long-term may suffer from addiction.3 The characterization of addiction is a constant pattern of inappropriate Opioid use and may include the following serious problems:

    • Loss of control of using Opioids
    • A preoccupation of acquiring more Opioids even though pain relief is achieved
    • Although adverse physical, psychological, or social consequences may occur, the patient continues using Opioids
    • Overdose and death increases as an adverse effect

Should you take Opioids? If you suffer from moderate to severe pain, Opioid drugs can make a significant difference in your pain levels. However, you must take them safely and follow your doctor’s instructions carefully to avoid the negative effects of Opioids.

Next week, we’ll explore Marijuana and its treatment of chronic pain. Have a great week!

1Opioid (Narcotic) Pain Medications article, WebMD, LLC, 2017

2Opioid (Narcotic) Pain Medications article, WebMD Medical Reference, Minesh Khari,MD, April 30, 2017

3What are Opioid Medications? Article, paindoctor.com

 

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Posted in Arthritis, Chronic lower back pain, chronic pain, Inflammation, Knee pain, Muscle and joint stiffness, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Options for Pain Relief

PART 2

Exploring Anticonvulsants, Muscle Relaxants, and Corticosteroids

In part one of this series of Options for Pain Relief, I wrote about NSAIDs, acetaminophen, and antidepressants. This post focuses on anticonvulsants (anti-seizure) medications, muscle relaxants, and corticosteroids. Because there is so much information regarding Opioids and Marijuana for treatment of chronic pain, I’ve decided to write two separate posts for each of these. The next post (Part 3) will be devoted to the pros, cons, and debates of Opioid use for chronic pain treatment.

Now, let’s discover how anticonvulsants, muscle relaxants, and corticosteroids are used as a relief for chronic pain.

ANTICONVULSANT (antiseizure) MEDICATIONS

Anticonvulsant medications are used for specific types of nerve pain (burning, shooting pain) and must be taken on a daily basis or as prescribed by your physician. Whether pain is experienced or not, this medication must be taken as directed for maximum results. This medication is not intended for an “as needed” dosage.

Some common side effects include sleepiness (which may improve the longer the medication is taken) and weight gain (one reason I stopped taking this medication), dizziness, and fatigue. If you suffer from kidney stones or glaucoma tell your doctor as anticonvulsants are not recommended for patients with these conditions. Newer anticonvulsant drugs do not require liver monitoring, however, if you have a kidney disease use caution when taking this medication.

Anticonvulsants are another example of a medication that is developed to treat one condition and is used to relieve the symptoms of an entirely different condition. Dual purpose anticonvulsants help patients manage their seizures while also helping chronic pain patients manage their pain. Studies provide conflicting views of treating chronic pain with anticonvulsants. Although there are studies advising other forms of treatment for chronic pain, other studies indicate that anticonvulsants are vital for managing chronic pain because of fewer long-term side effects.

Listed below are frequently prescribed Generic forms of anticonvulsants: (the brand name is noted in parenthesis)

  1. Gabapentin (Neurontin)*
  2. Carbamazepine (Tegretol)*
  3. Pregabalin (Lyrica)
  4. Phenytoin (Dilantin)
  5. Topiramate (Topomax)

*FDA approved the medication for treating chronic pain.

Many patients experience lower pain levels with anticonvulsants. Your doctor may use the trial-and-error method to find the drug form and dosage that treats your pain. Be sure to inform your doctor of side effects other than those he advised when taking anticonvulsants. Read the paperwork accompanying your medicine thoroughly, making note of any restrictions (no alcohol, etc.) while taking this medication.

*******

MUSCLE RELAXANTS

In the United States alone, an estimate of $100 Billion is spent annually for chronic pain management.  And among the numerous forms of chronic pain, one form is the Musculoskeletal pain. Its symptoms and discomfort are felt within the muscles, nerves, tendons, bones, and ligaments of the body. These symptoms may develop as an acute onset (rapidly and grow to severity quickly) or as chronic pain (slowly and long-lasting.) Like most chronic pain, Musculoskeletal pain that continues for three months or more is considered ‘chronic.’

Chronic musculoskeletal pain may be widespread or centered in one area of the body. Some of the more common parts of the body include lower back pain, myalgia (muscle pain), tendinitis, and stress fractures. The causes are as varied as the types of musculoskeletal pains – injury, overuse, poor posture, arthritis, and/or prolonged confinement.

To effectively treat the symptoms of pain and discomfort muscle relaxant medications may be used. Unlike their name, muscle relaxant drugs don’t act on the muscles themselves. Instead, the impact of the effects center on the central and peripheral nervous system.

Reported symptoms treated with muscle relaxants include:

  1. Bone Pain (dull, deep, penetrating pain)
  2. Connective Tissue Pain (felt within tendons or ligaments)
  3. Muscle Pain (less intense than Bone Pain, but causes range from injury to tumor)
  4. Tunnel Syndromes (result from compression of nerves)
  5. Joint Pain (aching, stiffness, swelling or burning within a joint(s))
  6. Fibromyalgia (ligament, tendon, muscle pain)

The most commonly prescribed muscle relaxant medications are Baclofen, Carisoprodol, and Chlorzoxazone. All three work on the central nervous system, but each is prescribed for different pain problems. Baclofen is prescribed for muscle spasticity which occurs as a result of multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injuries. Carisoprodol is more commonly prescribed for the treatment of several musculoskeletal system disorders that cause acute pain. And Chlorzoxazone is typically prescribed for lower back pain and muscle spasms. Only one of these medications have received rare reports of acute liver injury. Chlorzoxazone use may be associated with liver injury, but, again these reports are rare.

However, two muscle relaxant drugs have been associated with causing acute liver damage (severe to fatal.) If you are prescribed either of these drugs, speak to your doctor extensively regarding this warning. The drugs are:

Dantroline (for chronic spasticity)   and

Tizanidine  (for acute symptoms of muscle spasms or chronic muscle spasticity)

The normal side effects of dizziness, drowsiness, and headaches accompany most of the drugs mentioned above. As with all medications prescribed or discussed in your doctor’s office, research the side effects online if your doctor fails to discuss them with you. It is your right to know exactly what you are putting into your body and the effects that may accompany those medications.

*******

CORTICOSTEROIDS

Administered in the form of a pill, a topical cream, or an injection, another class of anti-inflammatory drugs is Corticosteroids. As a stronger drug used to control severe swelling and pain, corticosteroids are prescribed for specific pain conditions. They were created to act like the natural steroids in your body. By altering the immune system, they control inflammation that causes decreased movement and pain in most joints and muscle tissues.

These drugs are periodically administered to treat cases of acute pain or flare-ups. Another common treatment is chronic swelling in the tendons and joints. To reduce pain and escalate joint and tissues flexibility, corticosteroids are used for the following conditions:

*Osteoarthritis

*Rheumatoid arthritis

*Synovitis

*Tendonitis

Common types of corticosteroids:

**Hydrocortisone

**Prednisone

**Methylprednisone

**Cortisone

And the possible side effects include:

-Headaches

-Nausea or vomiting

-Sleep problems

-Dizziness

-Changes in the skin (acne, redness, increased hair growth)

-Mental changes (anxiety, mood swings, depression

Again, let your doctor know of any extreme side effects including hands, feet, or face swelling, eye pain or other visual changes, a rash that will not disappear, new muscle pain/weakness, and/or tarry bowel movements.

Corticosteroids do work but injections are limited to a maximum number every six to twelve months each year. Pills are given in large increments and dwindle down to nothing in a matter of six to ten days. And topical creams are usually applied as needed or per your doctor’s orders. Be sure to talk extensively with your healthcare physician to understand the side effects and the likelihood you’ll receive pain relief with corticosteroids.

Next week I will post Part 3 of Options for Pain Relief – Opioids. Thank you for your patience and I hope you enjoy reading this information!

Carolyn

 

Posted in Chronic lower back pain, chronic pain, Uncategorized

Keeping a Pain Diary or Journal

Cheers to a rainy Friday! (Rather a rainy day where I live.)

Lately, I’ve read several articles about the need for keeping a journal or diary of chronic pain levels. At first, I skipped the articles and went to my business of writing. However, the more I read, the more I decided this activity would be beneficial in many ways.

You ask, “How will keeping a pain diary or journal help me?”

I’m glad you asked! Keeping a journal or diary of your daily pain activity chronicles your “ups and downs” with pain. For example:

  1. your pain level is higher on rainy days 
  2. your sleep is disrupted because your pain woke you up 
  3. a change in medication dosage may lower or increase your pain

These are a few of the actions you can chronicle with a pain diary. Over time, you’ll have a detailed report for your personal needs and for your doctor to review. Depending on Your pain results help your doctor manage your pain more effectively. He will see the symptoms of your pain and how it varies depending on the time of day.

There are “apps” specifically for tracking your pain levels. But after reading Jo Young’s article, “How I Started a ‘Pain Diary” (and Why I Think You Should, Too) I created my own diary with columns specific to my needs. Using Excel or a spreadsheet of your choice,  below are sample column headings you may find beneficial:

  • DATE
  • MORNING  (Pain level 1-10)
  • AFTERNOON  (Pain level 1-10)
  • NIGHT  (Pain level 1-10)
  • DOSAGE OF MED-X (Dosages and frequency can affect your pain level.)
  • DOSAGE OF MED-Y
  • DOSAGE OF MED-Z
  • WENT OUTSIDE? (Sometimes we just don’t feel like going outside, like today)
  • MENTAL STATE   (Bad, Very Bad, Neutral, Good, Very Good are some suggestions)
  • HOURS OF SLEEP  (Hours of uninterrupted sleep, not including naps.)  
  • EXERCISE   (Amount of, type, time spent)
  • NOTES:  (Put anything here as additional info for yourself or your doctor)

Your entries offer valuable information to help you cope with your pain. In addition, your pain diary helps your doctor’s decisions to manage your pain more effectively. And remember – start a pain diary if you were just diagnosed or experienced pain for years! After a few weeks, you’ll begin to see a pattern of your pain levels and what appears to affect it.

Would you mind letting me know when you start your pain diary or journal? And would you share your findings? I won’t share your personal information but may use your findings (along with other readers) in a blog post!

Thank you for stopping in to read! I appreciate your time and look forward to your comments!

Blessings sent your way,

Carolyn

webmd_rm_photo_of_pain_journal

Posted in Arthritis, Chronic lower back pain, Coping with Chronic Pain, Fatigue, Fibromyalgia, Knee pain, Muscle and joint stiffness, Rheumatoid Arthritis

More Info About “Patients Like Me”

Good morning!

If you haven’t signed up for “Patients Like Me” this post will give you more in-depth information about this unique website. As a patient with chronic back pain, Fibromyalgia, and joint inflammation and pain I have found Patients Like Me (PLM) offers a way to track my daily symptoms, conditions, and treatments. Let me explain.

The goal of PLM is to help patients become involved in the care of their conditions – Fibromyalgia, chronic pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, Bipolar, or any health condition that involves symptoms that the patient may be dealing with. You (the patient) gives data to PLM and they (PLM) gets that data and processes it into information for You.

You (the patient) give data (your conditions, symptoms, treatments) to PLM and (PLM) gets your data, processing your information into “data points” These data points are combined with all the conditions, symptoms, and treatments of patients in their system. This information is then available for YOU to see and explore.

If you have chronic back pain you can look up how many patients have your chronic back pain, their symptoms of chronic back pain, what medications they take for chronic back pain, and how they cope.

  1. Click on CONDITIONS at the top of your dashboard
  2. If you have listed chronic back pain in the system you can find your condition from “My Conditions” at the right of the form. Or you can “look up” chronic back pain in the space provided.
  3. Type in Chronic Back Pain.
  4. You will find Chronic Idiopathic Back Pain which is pain that lasts for 3 months or more.
  5. Below Chronic Idiopathic Back Pain are an Overview of the patients in PLM by age, sex, and the start date of this condition.
  6. Look at the table on the left and you’ll find sections on “How it affects people,” “How people treat it,” and “Compare treatments.”
  7. Click on “how people treat it”
  8. As of the date of this post, there are 79 treatments for Chronic Idiopathic Back Pain listed by patients.
  9. You can shorten the list by the “Top 10 treatments”
  10. Click on Hydrocodone (for example) and you’ll find an overview of the drug. Below is a chart of the reported purpose and perceived effectiveness
  11. 1166 patients take Hydrocodone for pain. As you scan through the chart you’ll see the other conditions Hydrocodone is taken and how effective it is for patients

You can look up your conditions and symptoms in the same manner. This information may not seem relevant, but once you are able to compare the evaluations of other patients you find you aren’t alone is this battle to cope with your condition. You can even find info about how other patients take a medication, with food or without food.

Explore the site to see if it is the right fit for you. I’ve found it’s a great way to track my progress by submitting my daily info. Charts show me if a medication is working, how my symptoms change, and a detailed chart I can take to my next appointment with my pain management doctor.

I was amazed that she wanted the info to put in my chart. She found it interesting and a great tool for her to see how I progress. Take a moment to check out PLM. It might be a good fit for you or you may feel you just don’t have the time to submit your information. But look at it this way. If you submit your information you are contributing to PLM’s research and their commitment to sharing people’s information to clinical trials, the FDA, AstraZenaca, Takeda Pharmaceuticals, and M2GEN (cancer patients research team.)

Thanks for reading and let me know if you join PLM. I wish you a day with very little pain so you can enjoy doing the things you love to do!

Warmly,

Carolyn

 

Posted in Arthritis, Chronic lower back pain, Fatigue, Fibromyalgia, Health Care, Knee pain, Muscle and joint stiffness, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Patients Like Me

Hello, and I hope you are enjoying a low pain or pain-free day!

Finally, after weeks of inflammation and burning pain in all my joints, I have started on the generic brand of Celebrex! (I took this medication years ago when it first came on the market and then was taken off the market due to symptoms of heart problems in patients.) My PA explained Celebrex was doing a great job now and thought I would have good results with it. And she was right! Within 24 hours my inflammation was down and the pain level in my joints was as low as a 2 or 3. I believe it may be helping my lower back, where I have arthritis because my back pain level has been lower, also!

Isn’t it great when you try a medicine and it actually works? There are several medications I’m on that make me wonder if they are doing anything for me. My doctors usually answer that if I were off of the medicines I would see how they are helping me. And although I consider taking myself off those meds, I don’t believe I want to go through the process of getting back on them. So far now, I’ll stick to my medication list.

Today I want to introduce you to a great site I found called Patients Like Me. I came upon this website by accident. After reading the synopsis of PLM I decided to join and see what it could do for me. Bottom line…this is a great site for anyone with hidden illnesses and any illness that impairs you with pain, discomfort, or wishing you knew somebody with the same problems.

PLM claims over 500,000 patients with over 2700 conditions on the single mission of putting patients first! And when you join you’ll understand this statement more thoroughly. PatientsLikeMe is the brainchild of Jamie Heywood, whose brother, Stephen, age 29 was diagnosed with ALS in 1998. Together with brother, Ben, Jamie tried treating his brother’s symptoms and slowing the disease even though it progressed rapidly. Jamie and Ben realized that researching for information and answers to help their brother and his disease was time-consuming and difficult.

Along with another friend, Jeff Cole, the brothers initially launched PatientsLikeMe to connect ALS patients, but it quickly expanded, and in 2011, [they] opened the website to all patients and all conditions¹. Fortunately, for us, we have the opportunity to be a part of PLM and contribute to the research of our diseases while forming relationships with patients, listing our medications, taking forms to our doctor visits, and reporting our daily symptoms. All of these items contribute to the goal of PLM: “a free website where persons share their health data to track their progress, help others, and change medicine for good!²”

I’ve been a member since March of this year and have already met so many new friends through this wonderful site. Not only do you enter your medications for your own needs, but you learn how many PLM patients are on the same medication, encounter similar symptoms, and give advice on taking the medication and how they alleviate their symptoms.

Each day you receive an email asking “how are you feeling today?” PLM is not looking for sugar-coated answers to this question. You tell it like it is. Log in, mark the face you feel at the time you log in (Very Bad, Bad, Neutral, Good, Very Good) and then you can give an explanation of your feeling. This is optional but this piece of information gives you insight into other patients’ symptoms and how their pain is affected by the weather, stress, and frustration.

Because I don’t want to bore you, I’m going to stop for now. But in a couple of days, I’ll post a follow-up to this note with more information on PatientsLikeMe. If you join, please let me know so I can start following you! My username is CNRobin62 and I believe you can search for me and follow me. Then just send me a note that you joined per my blog post. We’ll chat and before you know it you’ll have an arsenal of like disease friends who understand your feelings and frustrations.

For now, enjoy the rest of your day and I hope you have a wonderful week ahead. Thank for reading and I look forward to our next meeting!

Hugs,

Carolyn

 

 

 

Posted in Chronic lower back pain

Decision Reached – Spinal Cord Stimulator

I’m back! And I made a major decision two weeks ago with my pain management doctor. I told him I wanted the Spinal Cord Stimulator removed from my back. He looked at me intently and asked, “Why?”

Then I went through my list of prepared reasons:
1- it doesn’t work
2- my pain has increased and the SCS isn’t even touching the pain
3- the battery bothers me
4- little strikes of pain are felt along my spine

He smiled and said, “Okay.” The reason for his question, he explained, was most patients begin to give reasons for wanting the Stimulator removed and realize they don’t have a valid reason. The SCS helps them at some percentage (the best results say 50% pain is removed) and they decide to leave it in.

However, with me it’s a different story. The trial for the SCS went great. One lead was inserted in my right side and left in my back for 5 days. I had no pain on my right side. But my left side hurt continuously.

When the right lead was removed, all my pain returned and I knew this was the product for me! Finally, quality of life would return and I would dance again.

Unfortunately, after the implantation of three leads and the battery pack, and numerous reprogramming… my pain has been with me every day since the surgery. In fact, it has increased. I didn’t enjoy the relief I received from the trial. Why? Nobody knows. But it would have saved a heck of a lot of money and discomfort if that darn trial hadn’t work.

I’m not saying it doesn’t work for everybody. Just me. It works for my husband. His SCS gives him about 30% decrease in his back pain with medication. (Yes, even with the SCS most patients take medication to manage their pain.)

I’ve read countless reports of how the SCS “gave me my life back” and I did my research prior to the trial. I didn’t go into this without thorough information. Yet, it didn’t work.

How do you know if the SCS will work for you? First, I would suggest you have the same doctor perform the trial and the actual implant. (It took half a dozen doctors before I found one who agreed to do the surgery due to the instrumentation in my back.) If you have the same doctor do both procedures, and I believe in most cases that is the correct approach, then you’re ahead of the game I played.

Secondly, research, research, research! Talk to other patients who have had the SCS implanted. Try to find people with similar back problems, and ask them a ton of questions.

And lastly, depending upon the Spinal Cord Stimulator Company your doctor uses, go to their website and read the reviews, find out what to expect, and ask questions on their site. Most companies have a patient forum but if you can’t find one, Google – Spinal Cord Stimulator Patient Forums.  These are the ones I found:

http://www.spine-health.com/forum/categories/spinal-cord-stimulation

http://www.mdjunction.com/forums/spinal-cord-stimulator-discussions/general-support

forums.webmd.com/3/pain-management-exchange/forum/2961

http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=16&m=2687933   —  this one came up when I clicked on Boston Scientific Spinal Cord Stimulator/Right Leg
And there are many more forums listed…
As with any medication you are prescribed, you look it up, check out the side effects, and read the reviews before taking the medicine. With the proposal of a Spinal Cord Stimulator, treat it as you would a new medication.
RESEARCH IT!
I’m having the battery pack removed, not the leads because they have adhered to my spine. But when I talk to the surgeon and have the surgery, I’ll let you know how it went. Until then….
Here’s hoping you feel better today than yesterday and even better tomorrow!
God bless,
Carolyn