Posted in Health Care

Customer Relations Management (CRM)

Customer relations management (CRM) is software that uses information technology to help organizations build customer relationships and increase the value of the goods and/or services it provides.  The advantages of CRM include tracking and documenting customer history with instant access to those records, determining the best-selling practices for the organization and analyzing reasons behind customer complaints.

A medical office benefits from the CRM techniques in a variety of ways.  First, gathering complete patient history along with recording every subsequent office, lab and radiology visit allows CRM to track, document and monitor the patient’s information.   Physicians access patient information instantly, enabling effective health care for the patient.  Correct diagnoses facilitate prescriptions, tests and/or procedures for the patient’s care.

Secondly, future occasions of communication with the patient, including phone calls, visits and surveys, are documented and recorded in the CRM.  The CRM monitors the information and suggests support and service practices for the medical office to consider for improving patient relations.  In addition, by responding to the patient’s needs and creating improvements with business practices and services, the medical office effectively attains its performance goals.

Although CRM helps the medical office staff improve patient relationships, ultimately, effective communication is required for formulating the correct diagnoses and care.

Ineffective communication within a medical office however, creates a number of dangers for the medical office and its patients.  CRM offers recommendations based on the input of complete and detailed patient history.  The patient needs to feel he can disclose all pertinent information to the nurse or physician, without judgment.  In addition, the physician needs to create an atmosphere where the patient has no inhibitions expressing his concerns, problems and symptoms.  If the patient feels embarrassed or ashamed of disclosing all information, the physician is unable to properly treat his problem.  Ineffective communication results in the possibility of the patient being misdiagnosed and/or receiving incorrect medication.

Problems occur with ineffective communication among the office staff also.  If an administrative assistant receives incorrect information from a nurse regarding future appointments, the patient may be scheduled for a follow-up rather than a procedure with the physician.  The nurse gives the patient specific instructions, for example, stopping blood pressure medication ten days prior to the procedure.  Because being off the blood pressure medicine is dangerous for the patient, he waits several weeks until he is able to go off the medication again and further delays the procedure.  In addition, the appointment, certified incorrectly for a follow-up with his insurance requires additional time to re-certify the procedure.  The certification process takes hours or days depending upon the type of procedure and insurance coverage. These problems, due to ineffective communication, cause the patient to suffer longer than necessary and cost the medical office in wasted time and money.

The CRM is an important and effective tool for the medical office.  However, it relies on effective communication among the medical staff members and patients in order to offer the medical office assistance with improving patient relationships as well as the value of its services.

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Posted in Uncategorized

Part 2 – Depression and Chronic Pain

Welcome Back!!!

As many Chronic Pain Sufferers know, depression attaches itself to the excruciating pain you already suffer through. This occurs for a variety of reasons:

  • you just don’t feel well
  • you don’t feel like going out with friends
  • you may feel abandoned by your friends
  • you can’t do the things you did before the pain became “chronic”

And I’m sure there are many other reasons to spark your depression, but I found these to be the top four that hit me wth depression faster than my pain meds took effect.

We talked about the warning signs of questionable therapy and counseling to look for when you decide to go to a counselor or therapist in Part 1 and we’re going to continue with the next 18 items:

19. Without authorization, your therapist discloses your identifying information.

20. Your therapist begins to tell you the identity of another client.

21. You learn your therapist has never participated in personal therapy work.

22.You find you therapist cannot admit mistakes or accept feedback.

23.Without helping you to change, your therapist focuses extensively on diagnosing.

24.Counselor talks way too much, without giving you a chance to speak.

25.Or, your therapist doesn’t talk at all.

26.Leaving you confused, your therapist speaks in “psychobabble.”

27.Without considering your feelings and somatic experiences, your therapist focuses on thoughts and cognition at your expense.

28. At the exclusion of thoughts, insight, and cognitive processing, counselor focuses on feelings and somatic experience.

29. Acting as if they have the answers/solutions to everything, therapists spend time telling you how to best fix or change things in your life.

30. Your Counselor gives frequent unsolicited advice, makes decisions for you, or tells you what to do.

31.Your dependency is encouraged by your therapist by allowing you to get your emotional needs met from the therapist.

32. Against your will, your therapist attempts to keep you in therapy.

33.The belief factor of the therapist is that only her counseling works and she ridicules the approaches of other therapists.

34.Making you feel uncomfortable, your therapist is contentious with you or may be confrontational.

35.Your counselor doesn’t remember your name or your interactions from one session to the next.

36. Appearing to be in her own little world, your therapist doesn’t pay attention to you, listen to you, or understand you.

I’m sure you will agree these are powerful factors to take into consideration when you are paying your hard earned money to see a therapist for help and guidance. Be sure to print these items out here or go to GoodTherapy.org for the full article. Part 3 is the last blog regarding the warning signs of questionable therapy. After that blog, we will look into the positive signs of therapy.

I hope these series are helping you with your therapy if you are going to a therapist or counselor or if you are considering going to a therapist. And hopefully, you are not seeing any of these negative factors with your therapist.

Take care of YOU, and I look forward to hearing from you,

Taking pain one day at a time,

Carolyn